*Inherit the Wind *is among my all-time favourite movies, however that’s not was this inquiry is every about.

You are watching: He that troubleth his own house shall inherit the wind meaning

If I’m not mistaken the initial line in the bible reads “He who troubleth his own house shall inherit the wind.” Now, I simply heard someone on TV referring to someone “inheriting the wind.” that guy’s remark made me realize that i really don’t understand what exactly the phrase means. (FWIW, the usage by the other on TV did no clarify things.)

Can someone set me straight?

Thanks all, in advance.


You build a home (and do to family) to avoid troubles prefer the wind (or fighting and have world you can trust), yet if you carry in troubles right into your residence it is the very same if you never had actually a house–the wind (fighting, mistrust) is inside.


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Jesus_Harold_Christ:

You construct a home (and make to family) to protect against troubles favor the wind (or fighting and also have world you can trust), but if you carry in troubles into your residence it is the same if girlfriend never had actually a house–the wind (fighting, mistrust) is inside.

What walk the phrase need to do through the plot that the movie?


The complete line is actually:

He that troubleth his own home shall inherit the wind:and the fool shall be servant come the wise of heart.

The second line clarifies a little. However, it’s a small hard to draw parallels, is the one that troubled his own home Cates*? If so, “the fool” seems to be referring to “he” and also his situation was definitely portrayed together the protagonist/correct side of the debate… ~ above the other hand, the “servant” side makes a tiny sense. If you prolong the overarching ramifications of the trial, the parallels right in more nicely… the law was “troubling” intelligent people/the country, yet eventually they gained proven wrong and also became servants come the “wise” thinking men, but It’s still a little of a stretch.*I’m utilizing movie names just for ease of comparison.


Jragon November 18, 2008, 11:08am #6
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Jragon:

The full line is actually:

He that troubleth his own home shall inherit the wind:and the stupid shall be servant come the wise of heart.

The second line clarifies a little. However, it’s a small hard to attract parallels, is the one who troubled his own residence Cates*? If so, “the fool” appears to be introduce to “he” and his case was definitely portrayed as the protagonist/correct side of the debate… on the other hand, the “servant” side provides a small sense. If you extend the overarching effects of the trial, the parallels fit in an ext nicely… the law was “troubling” clever people/the country, but eventually they got proven wrong and also became servants to the “wise” thinking men, but It’s tho a little bit of a stretch.*I’m making use of movie names simply for ease of comparison.

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Missed edit:I should include that the Old Testament often equates the court (uh… the court) through wisdom and also we often equate education (Cates) through the pass of wisdom so there’s a sort of “schism” in that if the court is wise, and the passers of wisdom are passing on contradictory ideas… who right? Is the teacher in the wrong due to the fact that he’s no passing wisdom correctly? Or is the old wisdom getting in the method of the brand-new wisdom?

Some food for assumed to offer the quote a little context:Proverbs 1:7 “The are afraid of the mr is the start of knowledge; stupid despise wisdom and instruction.”

Anyway, I should sleep and also can’t think straight, perhaps that’ll spark a tiny discussion in ~ least.